Red Star Yeast

We go through a lot of yeast around here.

In the months we’re out promoting a cookbook, instead of creating one, ingredients sit in our cupboards, forlorn. Come back! Play with us! 

However, now that we’re in full-time recipe development mode, those cupboard doors are opening and closing all day long.

Lately, I’ve been reaching for the yeast frequently. With constant tiny tweaks on our sandwich bread, our hamburger buns, pizza dough, and pita bread, we need that tiny alive micro-organism to help us lift our dough out of the pan, higher toward the ceiling.

And the only yeast we have in our home? Red Star Yeast.

We’re proud to announce that Red Star Yeast is the latest sponsor of our website.

 

When I’m out in public, talking and answering questions, I’m always ready for the most-asked question I receive: is yeast gluten-free?

Yes. Yeast is gluten-free.

However, not all yeasts are created alike.

Recently, I was in the back kitchen of Danny’s restaurant, doing some baking. I reached for a tub of yeast to set up a dough for hamburger buns. When I opened the lid, I was struck by the smell. It was a little too sweet, a little sour. It smelled almost chemical. I closed it up, then walked to the grocery store across the street to buy some Red Star Yeast.

We trust this yeast. It’s the only one we use.

I asked Linda Nelson, my contact at Red Star Yeast, to tell us a little about the company and why gluten-free baking matters to them. Here’s what she had to say:

Red Star Yeast has been a tradition in family baking for more than 125 years. Red Star Yeast is passionate about providing superior yeast products to home bakers.  Our people, our processes and our principles are focused on producing the highest quality yeast home bakers can count on.

The Chef’s Best award is awarded to the brand rated highest overall among leading brands by independent professional chefs. Red Star Yeast was the winner of the 2009 Chef’s Best Award for Taste.

Red Star Yeast is GMO-free, gluten-free, dairy-free.

We have worked with celiac organizations over the years to develop great-tasting, gluten- free, yeast-raised breads.  We feel it’s important that those who can not tolerate gluten can still enjoy eating bread.  Making bread at home is more economical and you can control what ingredients go into your bread.

Our new website has lots of baking tips, how-to videos, and tried and tested recipes – www.redstaryeast.com.  Our goal is to take the intimidation out of baking with yeast by educating them through our website. ”

She’s not kidding, by the way. There are some great recipes for gluten-free breads on their site, created for the traditional method as well as bread machines. They also have a section for tips about gluten-free baking on their site. This company truly does care about the gluten-free community.

 

If you have been reading for awhile, you know that we only take on sponsors whose foods we genuinely love and eat regularly in our home.

With the holidays coming up — cinnamon rolls! — and the cookbook recipes to further hone, I can promise you that I’ll be pulling a jar of Red Star Yeast out of our cupboard tomorrow morning.

 

24 comments on “Red Star Yeast

  1. Stacy

    Shauna, you are so right. There is nothing more disappointing than getting everything right with the recipe, but finding out too late that your yeast wasn’t as active as you had thought. My mother always used Red Star yeast, and I learned my baking from her. Lately I’ve been trying to explain to my kids about adding micro-organisms to food (we made homemade soy yogurt a couple weeks ago, which started the topic). They are thrilled to know that our homemade bread is full of yeast farts. Little boys, they take humor to a whole other level.

  2. Michelle

    I am one of the 40% of celiacs who must also avoid corn. I can only use the Red Star yeast in the 3-strip packets. It is the only yeast I have found so far that is not grown on corn (I believe it is grown on molasses if my memory is correct) or that doesn’t have corn-derived additives (ascorbic acid, sorbitol/sorbitan, etc). The Red Star in jars has additives. So happy with their yeast-only packets though.

  3. Kristina

    At the risk of being called a troll, I have to say “Wait, hold on.” If “we” trust this yeast and it’s the only one “we” use … how did Chef Danny come to have an inferior yeast in his kitchen to begin with? Does domeone else do the ordering? And if so, wouldn’t they order want the Chef wants and demands? Since you’ve been baking so much together from the outset of your romance (not just for the latest book) I’m surprised a professional Chef and someone such as yourself, so keen on ingredients, wouldn’t have already made this brand the “go to” product from the outset if it’s the only one you both trust. Still glad to have the endorsement, but I hope it isn’t influenced by the sponsorship.

    1. shauna

      Kristina, Danny is one of the chefs at the restaurant. He’s not the head chef. He’s happily a line cook who creates the specials. (He already has a full-time job with me, cooking and creating the cookbooks.) The part I like best is that he’s not in charge of ordering or costing at all. He just cooks. It’s a great restaurant. They use a very popular brand of yeast. But we prefer Red Star Yeast. It’s a personal preference.

  4. Katie

    Sadly, the links to many of the g-f recipes on the Red Star site don’t work. But thanks for the pointer. Maybe they will get around to fixing it. 🙂

    1. Jabbara

      I had the same problem, disapointing. Even the link to the GF site from your post didn’t work. I do like Red Star yeast however.

      1. shauna

        I just checked and they’re all working, save the white bread. Something must be up with that one, but everything else worked. Try refreshing your browser or perhaps trying another kind of browser?

        1. shauna

          Well, I’m confused by this. But if you go directly to the Red Star Yeast website, you can simply search gluten-free and find a wealth of material.

  5. Julie @ Burnt Carrots

    Hi! I’m not a great baker….. but am glad I’m apparently doing something right! I always use Red Star Yeast. I also store it in the fridge. Is this okay? Also, how long is it good for? Thanks!

  6. Kevin

    In our home we’ve used mostly Fleischmann’s in packets, but last year when we started baking every week rather than buying bread it was more practical to buy yeast by the jar. Our local market only had Red Star in jars, so that’s what we started using, and I’ve been very pleased with the results – enough so that I’ve kept using the Red Star even after the market started carrying other brands in jar quantities. I’m a bread dunce, and I’m getting lovely round loaves every time.

  7. Eileen

    Congrats on the new sponsor! I checked & as of today all the links work for me (Win 7/Chrome). I’ll be exploring the GF recipes in more detail soon. Sad that they all measure by volume not weight. I like what King Arthur Flour (KAF) does with their recipes, giving you a choice then showing it all properly calculated for each ingredient. As for the product, we’ve (successfully) used jarred Red Star active dry in a pinch but to save money usually order bulk SAF instant red or gold from KAF. I didn’t realize until checking those links that Red Star is just the home use brand for the same company that makes SAF. I’d never have thought that from the marketing or other materials!

    The downside- their GF tips info left a lot to be desired: lots of info but poorly organized, incomplete & hard to read. Hopefully they improve that very soon. One area in particular was frustrating- their GF recipes include a note that they don’t recommend instant yeast for GF baking, but neither the link they refer to nor the GF tips page address this, never mind giving a reason why or info on working with other yeast types if that’s all someone has on hand. I know that’s not your call but maybe you can encourage them to share more info? Anyway, I asked the question in a comment to one of the recipes (along with thanking them for supporting your great blog) & look forward to reading what they have to say. The point to all this lead up (yes, there is one! LOL) is to give context for this request: when you’re writing about yeast baking at some point would you please share some more detailed info on your yeast experiences? Thanks so much for everything!

    1. Linda Nelsen

      Hi Eileen, Thank you for your comments & suggestions. We also received your question in the recipe comment section of our website, but will address them here. We have already made a few changes to our GF Tips section, hopefully making it easier to follow. To clarify our instant yeast statement in the recipes, GF doughs tend to be ‘weaker’ than wheat flour doughs and do not tolerate the fast action of the instant (Red Star Quick Rise) yeast as well. Sometimes an adjustment in the amount of yeast used will resolve the problem. We will make some changes to relay this information more clearly. We always welcome suggestions to make our website more user friendly. Happy baking!

      1. Eileen

        Thanks for giving a little more detail about yeast choices for GF baking, and for working on your site’s GF section. I look forward to following along with your changes! Could it be that I have good results with instant yeast because I seldom use it on the quick schedule, so the weaker dough doesn’t get stressed as much?

  8. Linda Nelsen

    Hi Eileen, Thank you for your comments & suggestions. We also received your question in the recipe comment section of our website, but will address them here. We have already made a few changes to our GF Tips section, hopefully making it easier to follow. To clarify our instant yeast statement in the recipes, GF doughs tend to be ‘weaker’ than wheat flour doughs and do not tolerate the fast action of the instant (Red Star Quick Rise) yeast as well. Sometimes an adjustment in the amount of yeast used will resolve the problem. We will make some changes to relay this information more clearly. We always welcome suggestions to make our website more user friendly. Happy baking!

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